Smiling faces sometimes (are the one’s who learn most)

It’s been a while since I last put finger to screen to tap out a blog on here. But, I don’t want anybody to think I’ve been idle. Far from it! I write this having just been presented with my piece of paper that makes me a National Teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. I was inducted along with 54 exceptionally talented people from across the UK in the awe inspiring surroundings of Liverpool Cathedral.

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What strikes me about these awards, apart from them making us dress up to receive them, is that when we started talking amongst ourselves there was a large amount of confusion about the role of pedagogy in what we do. We were all in Liverpool supposedly to celebrate our excellence in teaching and learning, yet we seemed to have little collective analysis of what motivates people to learn.

To be sure, there were confident people in the room who had their pet theories (which they were happy to regale us with) but I came away more confused than when I had gone in. This is not a criticism of the NTF Awards. Everybody there had been innovative in some way and over a sustained period. Having been turned down previously I am under no illusions that these awards are not easy to obtain. But, doing excellence and reflecting on it are not the same thing.

I was left wondering how I can translate my own journey into something more useful to the learning community. I certainly couldn’t say “do what I did” as some of the funding streams I have benefitted from over the years no longer exist. And, even if they did, what I did then would no longer fit what you would need to do today. Times change, after all.

So, here, in a couple of paragraphs is the sum total of what I have learned in my 20 or so years in higher education.

1. All students are different. That sounds obvious. So it should. But sometimes I worry about academics who claim “Students don’t like….” as if a casual conversation with a single student is representative of the entire student body.
2. There are lots of ways to teach. Lectures may have their place but so do debates, role plays, problem-based learning, board games etc. The only thing that constrains our teaching is our imaginations.
3. Teaching and learning are not the same thing. Just because we are teaching it doesn’t mean anybody is learning.
4. Students learn in different ways. See 1 and 3. Not all learning takes place in formal learning environments. In fact, it is highly likely that most learning takes place away from the classroom and teachers. Get over it. Students don’t need us as much as we need them.
5. There is no such thing as a weak student. I know, this one takes a bit of selling. There are students who struggle, but it is usually not because they are “weak” but because they were badly advised in their course choice or are having a life crisis of one sort or another.
6. Online learning does not mean the death of education. Just because you like standing in a room talking at people does not mean that they like listening to you. Face to face teaching retains its place, but any lecturer/academic worthy of the name should embrace technologies that help to bring education to those traditionally denied it.
7. Learning should be fun. If I have learned anything at all over my years in HE it is that too much education is pompous, dull and excruciatingly boring. Who decreed that this should be the case? If you can put a smile on your students’ faces then they will learn more. Trust me on this.
8. Student engagement is about more than retention targets. Too much student engagement is concerned either with finding ways to increase retention or in filling places on various governance committees. Neither of these are engagement. An engaged student is one who feels that they are part of a community. That community might consist only of students or of academics and students, but in some way it must be self-sustaining. The idea that we can engage with hundreds of students simultaneously is a misnomer. Relationships are not sustainable at that level, so we need to provide environments where students can connect with 5 or 6 others in an environment where they feel safe and able to do so. The massification of higher education has made this harder to achieve than previously. This does not mean it is impossible.

That’s it for now. I may return to this theme. In the meantime, I’m happy to debate these ideas if you are so minded.

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2 thoughts on “Smiling faces sometimes (are the one’s who learn most)

  1. From my days of standing out in the cold and the rain teaching people to ride motorcycles, there is certainly challenges in teaching. I believe there is no such think as a bad student. I was down to me to find a away for them to understand what they needed to. If a student failed their test, my first question was “what did I do wrong?” Maybe it was because I love motorcycles and love the feeling of seeing a person ride off with confidence. Do you think academic teaching has that level of satisfaction and do tutors really have the passion in what they do?

    • Thanks for that comment. From my experience many teachers in higher education are extremely passionate about their subjects and that enthusiasm can be contagious. But often, somewhere along the way, they lose their enthusiasm and start to see teaching as a chore that takes them away from things they would rather be doing: research or cleaning their motorbike. I think it is a prerequisite for good teaching to have enthusiasm, either for teaching itself or your subject. But you have to take that enthusiasm and work out the tricky part, which is how to make your students equally as enthusiastic. I’m not convinced everybody wants to do that.

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